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    Wine Enthusiast   •  

    For example, at importer/retailer Dekantā, there are no plans to change which bottles are brought into the U.S., explains founder and director Makiyo Masa. However, many products will be recategorized or relabeled to conform to the new standards, she says. “Products that are known to contain both Japanese and imported whisky will be listed as ‘world blends,’” says Masa. “Any spirit that cannot be labeled as Japanese whisky under the new standards will be listed as being of ‘unspecified origin.’” This likely will apply to “less than 40%” of Dekantā imports, she estimates.

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    WhiskyCast   •  

    Japan’s whiskies have been getting more attention on the world stage. While some “Japanese Whiskies” are rightly winning awards in major competitions, others with the same label are often Scotch or Canadian whiskies imported into Japan – where there’s no legal definition for what is a “Japanese Whisky” and what isn’t. Now, Japan’s whisky makers are stepping in where the government has so far failed to act, creating an industry-wide definition requiring that whiskies labeled as “Japanese Whisky” must actually be distilled in Japan. We’ll discuss the new standards with Makiyo Masa of Dekantā, one of the largest online retailers specializing in Japanese whiskies.

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    The New York Times   •  

    While many of the premier brands, like Yamazaki and its 18 Year Old, point out that they are made exclusively in Japan, others refuse to say. “It puts Japanese whisky’s reputation at risk,” said Makiyo Masa, the founder of Dekanta, an online retailer.

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    CNA Luxury   •  

    In spite of a pandemic, the rare Japanese whisky market has performed exceedingly well. According to the Japanese 100 Index, which tracks the performance of Japanese drams, the prices of Japanese whisky surged 300 per cent from 2014 to 2020. In comparison, the price of gold surged by 60 per cent during the same period. Online spirits retailer Dekanta has now unveiled a private bottling of rare Karuizawa single malt that’s sure to attract collectors, especially those interested in Japanese art and culture.

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    South China Morning Post   •  

    Karuizawa distillery first opened in 1955 and closed in 2000 before the Japanese whisky boom in Western countries. Today, Karuizawa is regarded as one of the most sought-after Japanese distillers due to its limited remaining supply. This November, a private bottling of Karuizawa 35-year-old Budō collection will be released by dekantā.